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Theoretical Philosophy » Can the God of classical theism really be the creator? » 10/15/2017 6:13 pm

Nowwhat?
Replies: 13

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RomanJoe wrote:

Now for God, he can create from nothing precisely because his essence is his existence, he is pure actuality. Being existence and pure actuality itself, all he needs to do is create limiting principles (i.e. essence and potency) in order have beings that participate in existence.  

Here's the thing about that:

1.  God is the only infinite.
2.  If God creates by using limiting principles, those limiting principles will be finite. 
3.  Attempting to divine an infinite by a finite will result in an infinite.
4.  God cannot create a finite using limiting principles.
5.  God cannot have created this universe in the manner you propose
 

Theoretical Philosophy » Can the God of classical theism really be the creator? » 10/08/2017 11:49 pm

Nowwhat?
Replies: 13

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RomanJoe wrote:

Creation ex nihilo does not involve any prior potentials. It's not as if God is taking some actual state and actualizing its potential to exist otherwise. No, creation ex nihilo implies the bringing into being of something that did not previously exist in any respect. Change or motion is the actualization of a potential. So I think the first premise confuses change with creation. I would say more but I'm at work and I'm doing this on the sly.

But that which is neither actual nor potential is logically impossible (even God himself is included in the actual/potential dichotomy) and God's omnipotence does not include the logicallly impossible.  If it did, it would mean that God was a mix of rational and irrational, and God is not a mixture.

Also, if creation is not change, then God's creation did not change nothing, and nothing remains, and that's logically incompatible with the existence of anything.  So a creation that is not change is no creation at all.
 

Theoretical Philosophy » Can the God of classical theism really be the creator? » 10/08/2017 2:40 pm

Nowwhat?
Replies: 13

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1.  Creation is the act of bringing from potential to actual
2.  Potential requires an actual to exist within.
3.  God is fully actual
4.  God is the only actual being.
5.  No potential exists
6.  God cannot have brought anything from potential to actual
7.  God is not the creator

Seems like God has to either be a mixture of potential and actual, or there has to be another uncreated actual being to bear potential besides God.  Thoughts, critiques?

 

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