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Chit-Chat » Atheist = intellectual » Yesterday 7:48 pm

RomanJoe
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I encounter this regularly, especially among lay persons--the idea that atheism is to be equated with higher learning, critical thinking, etc. Why is this such a prevalent characterization in our culture? What do you think the historical roots are for this?

I partly blame some mainstream flavors of Christianity divorcing themselves from the theological tradition of philosophy alongside religion, and opting for a fideism based mostly--I guess--in good feelings and spiritual inspiration. The atheist is the natural skeptic of this form of theism, and is seen as someone who is grounded in the facts and prefers intellectual investigation over pure fideism.

Theoretical Philosophy » Reasons to assume idealism over realism? » 7/13/2018 2:19 pm

RomanJoe
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John West wrote:

I see. I don't think you should accept either of them. http://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/grin.png

Alrighty! Enlighten me.

Theoretical Philosophy » Reasons to assume idealism over realism? » 7/13/2018 2:03 pm

RomanJoe
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John West wrote:

But as far as this post goes, you might start by looking into the distinction between idealism and skepticism, and the distinctions between the different kinds of idealism, to get a better sense (or so that you'll be able to help us get a better sense, anyway) of what you're asking. It looks like you might be asking: “Why accept Kant's transcendental idealism over Thomism?”

Yes exactly. Your quoted question seems to capture the essence of my inquiry.

Theoretical Philosophy » Reasons to assume idealism over realism? » 7/13/2018 2:00 pm

RomanJoe
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John West wrote:

RomanJoe wrote:

I'm wondering what the motivation is for accepting the skeptical view over the common sense view?

I'm in the middle of writing a series of posts on skepticism for Ontological Investigations. I have to prioritize the philosophy I do during “the day”, the thesis research, over the philosophy I do in my leisure time for the blog and so there will be pauses between articles. But you will be able to find a lot of the skeptical arguments laid out in those posts.

I've only written two so far, and the first is really just an elongated notice about the series.

Thanks, I'll take a look.

Chit-Chat » Books you want to read » 7/13/2018 1:26 pm

RomanJoe
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seigneur wrote:

Essays on Catholicism, liberalism, and socialism: considered in their fundamental principles

(that's the title)

That sounds interesting

Theoretical Philosophy » Reasons to assume idealism over realism? » 7/13/2018 12:56 pm

RomanJoe
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I'm having issues trying to organize my thoughts around the epistemic groundwork for metaphysics. I am specifically interested in the competing views of the human mind as something that structures reality and the human mind as something which comprehends reality. The traditional realist will subscribe to the latter, confident that we do comprehend the quiddity of a thing, its form in the abstract, its essence--and they will say that this isn't merely the imposition of structuring concepts onto an indifferent noumenal world, rather it's the recognition of the world as it is. In other words the world and the mind are correlated. This is the common sense view, and our intuitions seem to affirm it.

Now the skeptic will see the human mind as a barrier to reality as it is in itself. On this view we can never really come to know the quiddity of a thing--or even if we happened to we may never know.

I'm wondering what the motivation is for accepting the skeptical view over the common sense view?

Chit-Chat » ​Who are your three biggest philosophical influences? » 7/05/2018 9:06 am

RomanJoe
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Jeremy Taylor wrote:

I like Daniel's division of life and academic influence. E. F. Schumacher may not be an academic philosopher, but his Guide for the Perplexed was a big influence on me, in the sense that when I read it in my late teens, I first realised there were rational anti-materialist arguments.

Although I am a huge Chesterton fan, C. S. Lewis in particular made some arguments of continuing philosophical worth. His famous chapter on the argument from reason, is a must be read for anyone interested in that argument, and anti-materialist accounts of the mind more generally.

 
Victor Reppert has written a whole book that broadens Lewis's argument from reason--its worth a read.

Theoretical Philosophy » Aristotelian realism vs Platonic realism » 7/04/2018 8:59 pm

RomanJoe
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A common critique of the Platonic idea of a bifurcated reality where particulars exist in the physical realm and uninstantiated universals or forms exist in a non-physical realm, is that it's hard to understand or even fathom how a concrete spatially limited being could bear any relation to the radically transcendent, non-particular, non-physical form. But doesn't the Aristotelian have the same issue? On the Aristotelian view all forms are instantiated and are only universal when abstracted via an intellect--but how does a concrete particular bear such a relation to universal abstraction?

Chit-Chat » ​Who are your three biggest philosophical influences? » 7/03/2018 7:35 pm

RomanJoe
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Albert Camus' The Plague originally got me interested in philosophy. We didn't have philosophy classes in high school so my English teacher covertly decided to peruse through some heavy philosophical issues such as nihilism, the source of moral values and obligations, whether or not one can truly be saint in a cosmos without God. He introduced a lot of this through Camus.

William Lane Craig was also a big influence, especially during my evangelical phase where I was desperately trying to scavenge for the pieces of of faith that I mistakenly thought had been left shattered by the cultural presumption of scientism. Definitely Feser, Aristotle, and Aquinas--and  Oderberg to a lesser degree--kindled my interest in metaphysics. I found Descartes and Kant fascinating but never explored them much. Nietzsche was fun to read and as of recent Thomas Nagel has prompted an interest in a naturalistic account of the mind.

Not sure if we're counting Lewis and Chesterton as philosophers, but they definitely were an influence during my early years of Christianity.

That was more than three.

Chit-Chat » Jordan Peterson on Bible stories » 6/25/2018 7:28 pm

RomanJoe
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Jordan Peterson is a hero of mine. He has pulled me out of some dark places. I don't think he's a very good philosopher--in some lectures he assumes a materialistic Darwinian perspective of the world. But he's a brilliant psychologist and I find some of his critiques on identity politics to be respectable.

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