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Theoretical Philosophy » A Question About Free Will » 10/25/2018 12:32 pm

Evander
Replies: 23

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I was posed these questions that I really didn’t know how to begin answering, and wanted to hear peoples thoughts about it:

How would you tell that something else had free will? How would you know that you yourself have free will?

Religion » The Problem of the Trinity and Divine Simplicity » 9/26/2018 12:08 pm

Evander
Replies: 63

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As I’ve stated before, my knowledge of philosophy is woefully subpar compared to the other users of this blog. I was wondering if this dissertation deals with any of the problems brought up by this thread. I realize dumping a 300+ page dissertation and asking people to read it is a bit asinine, but for those who are interested it could be worthwhile. For the record I have read some of it but most of the material went over my head.

https://philarchive.org/archive/BRATLP-3

Theoretical Philosophy » Philosophical Critiques of Evolution » 8/13/2018 9:09 am

Evander
Replies: 1

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I was listening to a radio interview of John Haldane (I don’t have a link), and he stated that he believes in God in part due to the inability of science to adequately explain three things:
1. How life arose from non-living matter
2. The process of speciation
3. The presence of rational animals, aka humans

Unfortunately he didn’t go into depth about those three points, however it got me thinking. Are there others who criticize evolutionary theory not based on empirical finding but instead based on principles (I mean philosophically) that would make the theory untenable? About two years ago I had a bit of a crisis of faith due to growing up in a well meaning, but fundamentalist Protestant church, mostly due to believing that evolution and Christianity (I suppose theism as well) were incompatible. I’ve since changed my views, however this area does interest me still.

Theoretical Philosophy » Answering Challenges to "Five Proofs" » 6/19/2018 5:06 pm

Evander
Replies: 32

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I’m one of those who just began reading Feser (and philosophy for that matter), so I suppose I missed the more knowledgeable readers’ criticisms. If this is a trend with Feser (namely, avoiding the tougher questions, or at least failing to go in depth with the material), perhaps what we could do is compile a list of questions we’d like him to answer and send them to him. I’m not sure if this is possible, but maybe it would work.

Religion » Questions about the New Testament » 6/05/2018 3:35 pm

Evander
Replies: 4

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@RomanJoe

Thanks for your response. I already had in mind much of what you wrote, but it assured me of my response.

@119

Just out of curiosity, how was the Tanakh (I hope that’s not offensive how i wrote it) formed? By that I mean, we’re there councils of some sort that decided which books belong?

Religion » Questions about the New Testament » 6/04/2018 1:23 pm

Evander
Replies: 4

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For those of you who consider themselves Christians, I need help with two questions asked by a Jewish friend of mine:

1) How much did Paul know about Jesus? Why does he leave out many of the things that are prominent in the Gospels?

2) Why does no other ancient writers talk about the miracles of Jesus?

I already have a few possible responses, but I thought that asking for assistance would be wise.

Thanks!

Chit-Chat » Yujin Nagasawa » 5/16/2018 2:07 pm

Evander
Replies: 11

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Does anyone know if Yujin Nagasawa is a theist? I’ve seen his name pop up during discussions about the Ontological Argument.

Religion » Trouble with Hell/Sin » 5/10/2018 9:51 am

Evander
Replies: 13

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Here is a summary of the video given by a commenter:

“This is brilliant, but the language is a little opaque. I suppose I'd summarise the key idea as follows: God's choice to create was a free choice - we do not worship a Pantheistic God who is part of Nature, or a god who is one among many -  we worship a God 'ontologically distinct' from creation, to use Hart's language. And we also worship a wholly good God. In this context, we must ask: is the eternal suffering of one creature, or even the 'risk' of the eternal suffering of one creature (for when the dice is thrown, that which is hazarded has already been surrendered) a wholly good choice of a wholly free being? Hart asks if the saved shouldn't see this creature as the scape-goat they could have been, their Christ? The doctrines of creation ex nihilio, of the goodness of God, and of the eternal damnation of any soul, are inconsistent, for how can creation be a good, free choice, if it is the choice to damn some (or to risk the damnation of some - again, this doesn't change the situation at all.) Hart stresses that this in some sense the 'infinite' evil of eternal damnation poses a far greater problem than the evil we see around us today: that while it may be possible that the future hope of the kingdom of God can somehow 'justify' temporary suffering, the same argument cannot be used to justify eternal suffering. He also insists that his universalism is linked to creation ex nihilio: if God's choice to create were not free, then perhaps he could reasonably settle for second best. But precisely because it was a free choice, God is morally responsible for every part of His creation. Finally, Hart insists his goal is not to judge God - he is merely questioning the validity of calling something 'good' which is clearly anything but good. When we talk of God, it is always in analogy, and words often only have limited meaning: but their meaning with regard to God should never be transparently opposite the meaning we

Religion » Trouble with Hell/Sin » 5/04/2018 11:57 pm

Evander
Replies: 13

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Hello,

​For those of you who are Christians (especially Roman Catholic or Eastern Orthodox), I have a few questions to ask, 
1) Do you ever have disagreements about the concept of eternal damnation? Or about the concept of "extra ecclesiam nulla salus" if you are Catholic (by the way, is there anything comparable in Eastern Orthodoxy)?
​2) How do people argue for which "account" of sin is right? For example, how would one decide whether Augustine's view is correct vs. the Eastern Orthodox view on sin? I feel like many things hinge on this....
​3) Has anyone seen this video by David Bentley Hart? I'm just starting to delve into philosophy/theology so his confidence can come across as persuasive, but his argument could still be faulty. What do you make of it?



Thanks for your help,

Evander

Theoretical Philosophy » Divine Hiddeness » 4/28/2018 6:59 pm

Evander
Replies: 45

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@DanielCC
Not to derail this thread, but when you refer to "the main argument for a perfect being", does that refer to Anselm's Ontological Argument? I was under the impression that there are few people who believe that it succeeds. Is there anyone here who thinks that it does?

@Miguel 

​Thanks for your input regarding the probabilistic nature of the argument (from divine hiddenness), that seems to make more sense to me.
 

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