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12/20/2018 2:01 am  #1


Aquinas and embodied cognition

I'm posting this here more for a "don't repeat yourself" but I find Aquinas's thoughts on philosophy of mind to be insightful, as it helps clarify some theses in AI.

One thesis in AI is embodied cognition, which is the belief that cognition requires a body in order for it to be truly cognition. And the strong answer to this thesis that Aquinas would give is no! So Aquinas is absolutely relevant to the modern research.

One good definition of knowledge is anything that is strong and useful. Aquinas is not only strong, but also useful. Therefore Aquinas had a lot of knowledge.

 

12/22/2018 10:54 am  #2


Re: Aquinas and embodied cognition

Due_Kindheartedness wrote:

One good definition of knowledge is anything that is strong and useful. Aquinas is not only strong, but also useful. Therefore Aquinas had a lot of knowledge.

One good definition of knowledge is anything that is strong and useful. Hammers are not only strong, but also useful. Therefore hammers have a lot of knowledge.

Beasts of burden, like ox, are also strong and useful and, so, also serve as counterexamples. But perhaps I'm being a pedant.

 

12/22/2018 9:02 pm  #3


Re: Aquinas and embodied cognition

John West wrote:

Due_Kindheartedness wrote:

One good definition of knowledge is anything that is strong and useful. Aquinas is not only strong, but also useful. Therefore Aquinas had a lot of knowledge.

One good definition of knowledge is anything that is strong and useful. Hammers are not only strong, but also useful. Therefore hammers have a lot of knowledge.

Beasts of burden, like ox, are also strong and useful and, so, also serve as counterexamples. But perhaps I'm being a pedant.

Knowledge is propositions that are strong and have a lot of utility. True is not necessary, because a lot of things that are not true are knowledge. E.g. you believe your Aunt Tilly is alive and before you get any news update she dies of a fever. Your belief that she is alive isn't true anymore, but it's still knowledge.

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12/22/2018 9:11 pm  #4


Re: Aquinas and embodied cognition

Due_Kindheartedness wrote:

Knowledge is propositions that are strong and have a lot of utility. True is not necessary, because a lot of things that are not true are knowledge. E.g. you believe your Aunt Tilly is alive and before you get any news update she dies of a fever. Your belief that she is alive isn't true anymore, but it's still knowledge.

You believe she's alive. Belief isn't knowledge. (You might say: "Okay, so I know she's alive until I get the news." But you don't, because there comes a point where your knowledge ceases to be knowledge and becomes a false (albeit justified) belief.)

I'm not entirely sure what it means for a proposition to be "useful" or "strong". The former sounds like it's talking about the usefulness of believing in the proposition. (I had a jokey paragraph about how it might be extremely useful for me to believe that Jeremy's head is a poached egg written out.) The latter sounds like it might be a category mistake.

 

12/22/2018 9:17 pm  #5


Re: Aquinas and embodied cognition

Due_Kindheartedness wrote:

Knowledge is propositions that are strong and have a lot of utility. True is not necessary, because a lot of things that are not true are knowledge. E.g. you believe your Aunt Tilly is alive and before you get any news update she dies of a fever. Your belief that she is alive isn't true anymore, but it's still knowledge.

No, it is not knowledge. You are not entitled to make up your own definitions unless you are willing to stand outside the community of discourse.
 

 

12/22/2018 10:53 pm  #6


Re: Aquinas and embodied cognition

ficino wrote:

Due_Kindheartedness wrote:

Knowledge is propositions that are strong and have a lot of utility. True is not necessary, because a lot of things that are not true are knowledge. E.g. you believe your Aunt Tilly is alive and before you get any news update she dies of a fever. Your belief that she is alive isn't true anymore, but it's still knowledge.

No, it is not knowledge. You are not entitled to make up your own definitions unless you are willing to stand outside the community of discourse.
 

What if I believe my definitions are better than the consensus? And besides, philosophers cope with other philosophers coming up with different definitions. They just argue or refute the idea on their terms. And philosophy was founded by a gladfly and non-comformist after all

And truth might be implicit in strong. Look at music theory, which is a body of knowledge (because that is the definition of a theory: a body of knowledge is knowledge but it doesn't involve describing reality in some way. But claims in music theory are strong (they characterize what sounds good near-completely) and has a lot of utility (you can use it to make video game music, symphonies, or just enjoy music you like more).

Last edited by Due_Kindheartedness (12/22/2018 10:53 pm)

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12/22/2018 11:07 pm  #7


Re: Aquinas and embodied cognition

There are also very likely useless things I know (quite a lot of them, I imagine). For instance, suppose I were to go out and count the number of blades of grass on my lawn. I would then know the number of blades of grass on my lawn. But the number of blades of grass on my lawn isn't useful.

 

12/23/2018 12:02 am  #8


Re: Aquinas and embodied cognition

John West wrote:

There are also very likely useless things I know (quite a lot of them, I imagine). For instance, suppose I were to go out and count the number of blades of grass on my lawn. I would then know the number of blades of grass on my lawn. But the number of blades of grass on my lawn isn't useful.

FUCK! But why does it seem as if utility is something integral to knowledge? You're aware of Norzick's utility theory of truth, right?

Last edited by Due_Kindheartedness (12/23/2018 12:09 am)

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12/23/2018 11:07 am  #9


Re: Aquinas and embodied cognition

Due_Kindheartedness wrote:

But why does it seem as if utility is something integral to knowledge?

I don't know! I don't think it does! Haha. (I'm actually really surprised that you keep pressing this.)

You're aware of Norzick's utility theory of truth, right?

No, but I'm familiar with pragmatist theories of truth.

 

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